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  • Antibiotics could be cut by up to one-third

    Antibiotics could be cut by up to one-third

    Nine in 10 dairy farmers participating in a new survey from the Royal Association of British Dairy Farmers (RADBF) say that the farming industry must take a proactive lead in the battle against antibiotic resistance. Those questioned also think that over the next five years they could cut their o...
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  • Turn up parasite control before spring turn out

    Turn up parasite control before spring turn out

    Spring turn out time is right around the corner for beef cattle producers. But, before you open the gate be sure parasite control is on your to-do list. “Don’t just talk about parasite control, do it,” advises Eldon Cole, University of Missouri Extension livestock specialist. Cole says monitorin...
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  • Common Cattle Diseases

    Common Cattle Diseases

    While it isn’t possible to cover the full range of animal diseases and conditions, it is useful to know something about the ones that are among the most common. If you think your livestock need treatment of any of the listed conditions or the animal just doesn’t seem right but you don’...
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  • Anaplasmosis

    Anaplasmosis

    Anaplasmosis is a vector-borne, infectious blood disease in cattle caused by the rickesttsial parasites Anaplasma marginale and Anaplasma centrale. It occurs primarily in warm tropical and subtropical areas.  The disease is not contagious but is transmitted most commonly by ticks.  It can also be...
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  • Relax, For now, Covid-19 Doesn’t Afftect Livestock

    Relax, For now, Covid-19 Doesn’t Afftect Livestock

    Years back while in veterinary school, our public health professor of zoonosis warned us that failure to recognise diseases in wild and domestic animals that can be transmitted to humans is the greatest sin a vet can commit. The diseases are called zoonoses. He further told us that such diseases ...
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  • Herd immunity: Disease transmission from wildlife to livestock

    Summary: Scientists provide guidelines for minimizing the risk of spreading disease between elk and cattle in Southern Alberta.  Transmission of diseases from wildlife to livestock is a common threat in Alberta, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. Foothills in the south...
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  • Responding to Covid-19 — A Once-in-a-Century Pandemic?

    In any crisis, leaders have two equally important responsibilities: solve the immediate problem and keep it from happening again. The Covid-19 pandemic is a case in point. We need to save lives now while also improving the way we respond to outbreaks in general. The first point is more pressing, ...
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  • Pigs’ genetic code altered in bid to tackle deadly virus

    Pigs’ genetic code altered in bid to tackle deadly virus

    Researchers have made an advance in the fight against a deadly virus that affects pigs. The team used advanced genetic techniques to produce pigs that are potentially resilient to African Swine Fever — a highly contagious disease that kills up to two-thirds of infected animals. The new pig...
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  • A common enemy: Through clinical trials, veterinarian fights cancer in animals, humans

    A common enemy: Through clinical trials, veterinarian fights cancer in animals, humans

    Raelene Wouda’s passion for improving cancer treatment starts with our four-legged friends. Wouda, Kansas State University assistant professor of clinical sciences, is conducting clinical trials to treat cancers in dogs, cats and other companion animals. When pet owners bring their dogs, ca...
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  • More for less in pastures

    More for less in pastures

    Getting more for less is an attractive concept. But it isn’t that easy when it comes to producing more food on less land with fewer resources. R. Howard Skinner has been researching this idea of more for less in agriculture. Skinner is a physiological plant ecologist and member of the USDA...
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  • Control Program of Hydatid

    Control Program of Cystic Hydatid Disease (2013–2018) Cystic hydatid disease (hereinafter referred as CHD) in man is caused principally by infection with the larval stage of the dog tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus. It is an important pathogenic zoonotic parasitic infection (acquired from anima...
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  • The Reasonable Use of Antiparasite Druas for Animals

    The Reasonable Use of Antiparasite Drugs for Animals [Abstract] As the rapid development of scientific technology, especially the pharmaceutical industry, the kinds of antiparasite drugs increase rapidly. It’s of great importance to use antiparasite drugs reasonably. Currently, antiparasite drugs...
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  • Biological treatment for cow disease

    Biological treatment for cow disease

    A University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researcher and his colleagues are far more certain now that a new biological treatment could prevent dairy cattle from getting uterine diseases, which might improve food safety for people. That’s because Kwang Cheol “...
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  • What does a healthy ageing cat look like?

    What does a healthy ageing cat look like?

      The hair coat of older cats may take on a clumped and spiked appearance associated with a reduction in grooming activity.   Just as improved diet and medical care have resulted in increased life expectancy in humans, advances in nutrition and veterinary care have increased the life span of...
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  • Antihypertensive effect of fermented milk products under the microscope

    Over the past decade, interest has been rising in fermented dairy foods that promote health and could potentially prevent diseases such as hypertension (high blood pressure). Functional dairy products that lower blood pressure and heart rate may offer consumers an effective alternative to antihyp...
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  • Water buffalo genome unveiled

    Water buffalo genome unveiled

    This is “Olimpia da Farfengo” the female Mediterranean water buffalo that researchers sequenced. An international team of researchers led by the University of Adelaide has published the full genome of the water buffalo — opening the way for improved breeding and conservation of...
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  • Sheep are able to recognize human faces from photographs

    Sheep are able to recognize human faces from photographs

    Sheep can be trained to recognise human faces from photographic portraits — and can even identify the picture of their handler without prior training — according to new research from scientists at the University of Cambridge. The study, published today in the journal Royal Society: O...
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  • When horses are in trouble they ask humans for help

    When horses are in trouble they ask humans for help

    Horse making demands: The horse a) lightly pushes and b) looks at the caretaker standing outside the paddock. Food is hidden inside one of the two silver buckets behind them. When horses cannot obtain this food by themselves, t hey give humans visual and tactile signals.   A new study has ...
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  • Infectious prion structure shines light on mad cow disease

    Infectious prion structure shines light on mad cow disease

    Groundbreaking research from the University of Alberta has identified the structure of the infectious prion protein, the cause of “mad cow disease” or BSE, chronic wasting disease in deer and elk and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, which has long remained a mystery. The infectiou...
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  • Risk Factors for Uterine Disease in Dairy Cows

    Risk Factors for Uterine Disease in Dairy Cows

    Uterine diseases are highly prevalent in high-producing dairy cows. Metritis affects about 20% of lactating dairy cows, with the incidence ranging from 8% to >40% at some farms (Curtis et al. 1985; Galvão et al. 2009a; Goshen and Shpigel 2006; Hammon et al. 2006; Huzzey et al. 2007; Markusfeld...
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  • Sheep gene insights could help farmers breed healthier animals

    Sheep gene insights could help farmers breed healthier animals

    Fresh insights into the genetic code of sheep could aid breeding programmes to improve their health and productivity. Scientists have mapped which genes are turned on and off in the different tissues and organs in a sheep’s body. Their findings shed new light on the animal’s complex ...
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  • Some calves are inherently optimistic or pessimistic, just as humans are, a new University of British Columbia study has found.

    Some calves are inherently optimistic or pessimistic, just as humans are, a new University of British Columbia study has found.

    Recognizing these individual personality differences is important to ensure animals are treated well, says professor Marina von Keyserlingk, who led the research team from UBC’s animal welfare program in the faculty of land and food systems. “Sometimes we are tempted to see only the h...
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  • Why aren’t some dogs walked regularly?

    Why aren’t some dogs walked regularly?

    A new study from the University of Liverpool in collaboration with The University of Western Australia has examined why some people feel motivated to walk their dogs regularly and others don’t. There are more than 8 million dogs in households across the UK. Unfortunately not all of them ar...
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  • Scientists work to develop heat-resistant ‘cow of the future’

    Scientists work to develop heat-resistant ‘cow of the future’

    University of Florida scientists are working to breed the “cow of the future” by studying the more heat-tolerant Brangus cow — a cross between an Angus and a Brahman. Raluca Mateescu, an associate professor in the UF/IFAS department of animal sciences, is part of a team of UF/I...
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