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  • New experimental vaccine for African swine fever virus shows promise

    New experimental vaccine for African swine fever virus shows promise

    Government and academic investigators have developed a vaccine against African swine fever that appears to be far more effective than previously developed vaccines. The research appears this week in the Journal of Virology, a publication of the American Society for Microbiology. Currently, there ...
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  • Genetic outcomes of translocating bighorn sheep

    Genetic outcomes of translocating bighorn sheep

    Translocation is an important management tool used for nearly 100 years to increase bighorn sheep population numbers in Wyoming and to restore herds to suitable habitat throughout their historical range. Yet, translocation also can alter the underlying genetic diversity of managed wildlife specie...
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  • Herd immunity: Disease transmission from wildlife to livestock

    Transmission of diseases from wildlife to livestock is a common threat in Alberta, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. Foothills in the southwestern part of the province are home to wild elk as well as cattle on ranchlands — and when the species intermingle, the p...
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  • Deadly bacterial infection in pigs deciphered

    Deadly bacterial infection in pigs deciphered

    New-born piglets often die painfully from infection with an intestinal bacterium. A team of researchers from 3 faculties at the University of Bern has now discovered how the bacterium causes fatal intestinal bleeding. They have thus made a breakthrough in veterinary research. Promising prospects ...
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  • ‘Invisible,’ restricted horse racing therapy may leave a trail

    ‘Invisible,’ restricted horse racing therapy may leave a trail

    A treatment called extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) is used in patients both human and equine to speed healing of injured tendons and ligaments. Using high-pressure sonic waves, ESWT is thought to increase blood flow to the treated area and has been shown to reduce pain over the short term...
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  • Wild animals’ immune systems decline with age, sheep study finds

    Wild animals’ immune systems decline with age, sheep study finds

    It is well established that weakened immune systems in old age affect people’s health and fitness, but a study suggests that it is also an issue for wild animals. Researchers studying wild Soay sheep on the remote St Kilda archipelago have revealed that the animals’ immune responses t...
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  • Stand out from the herd How cows communicate through their lives

    Stand out from the herd How cows communicate through their lives

    Farmers might finally be able to answer the question: How now brown cow? Research at the University of Sydney has shown that cows maintain individual voices in a variety of emotional situations. Cows ‘talk’ to one another and retain individual identity through their lowing. Studying a...
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  • Humans, livestock in Kenya linked in sickness and in health

    Humans, livestock in Kenya linked in sickness and in health

    If a farmer’s goats, cattle or sheep are sick in Kenya, how’s the health of the farmer? Though researchers have long suspected a link between the health of farmers and their families in sub-Saharan Africa and the health of their livestock, a team of veterinary and economic scientists ...
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  • Experts disagree on horses with incoordination

    Experts disagree on horses with incoordination

    At least one in 100 horses at some point in its life will lose the ability to control of its gait as a result of developing the neurological disorder ataxia. Once found to be ataxic, the horse is often put down, or undergoes an expensive operation with dubious results. But now researchers from th...
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  • Foaling mares are totally relaxed, stress free, study finds

    Foaling mares are totally relaxed, stress free, study finds

    Foaling in horses is extremely fast. labor and the active part of foaling, resulting in delivery of the foal, take 10 to 20 minutes and are considerably shorter than giving birth in humans or in cows. Is this brief period stressful for the animals or are horses more relaxed than humans when givin...
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  • Bio-digester supplies energy to 3000 farms

    Bio-digester supplies energy to 3000 farms

    The principle of action of the digestive system of a cow served as a model to Camilo Pagés and Alexander Eaton to create a container that receives organic waste, mostly livestock manure, where it is mixed with millions of bacteria to obtain natural gas integrated mostly of methane, called biogas,...
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  • Happy cows make more nutritious milk

    Happy cows make more nutritious milk

    Daily infusions with a chemical commonly associated with feelings of happiness were shown to increase calcium levels in the blood of Holstein cows and the milk of Jersey cows that had just given birth. The results, published in the Journal of Endocrinology, could lead to a better understanding of...
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  • Cutting cattle carbon Bad breath and flatulence

    Cutting cattle carbon Bad breath and flatulence

    Cattle have bad breath and commonly suffer from severe, chronic flatus generating large amounts of methane, which is a greenhouse gas and a driver of anthropogenic global warming. There is an obvious answer to this problem, stop breeding cattle. Unfortunately a large proportion of us enjoy our bo...
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  • Cooling cows efficiently with water spray

    Cooling cows efficiently with water spray

    Dairies use intermittent sprinkler systems to cool cows in warm weather, but little experimental work has been done to determine how much water is needed to achieve beneficial effects. A group of dairy scientists conducted a study at the University of California, Davis, to examine the effects of ...
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  • Consumers sour on milk exposed to LED light

    Consumers sour on milk exposed to LED light

    Got LED light? Display cases and grocery stores increasingly do, and that’s bad news for milk drinkers. Cornell University researchers in the Department of Food Science found that exposure to light-emitting diode (LED) sources for even a few hours degrades the perceived quality of fluid mil...
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  • Detection of unusual hybrid schistosomes in Malawi

    LSTM’s Professor Russell Stothard is senior author on a new paper in which researchers from the UK and Malawi have described the unusual occurrence of novel schistosome hybrids infecting children along the Shire River Valley. The findings, published in the journal Emerging Infectious Disea...
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  • Changing climate may affect animal-to-human disease transfer

    Climate change could affect occurrences of diseases like bird-flu and Ebola, with environmental factors playing a larger role than previously understood in animal-to-human disease transfer. Researchers from The University of Queensland and Swansea University have been looking at how different en...
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  • Translocation of bighorn sheep in Arizona has positive genetic outcomes

    Translocation of bighorn sheep in Arizona has positive genetic outcomes

    Translocation is an important management tool that has been used for more than 50 years to increase bighorn sheep population numbers in Arizona and to restore herds to suitable habitat throughout their historical range. Yet, translocation also can alter the underlying genetic diversity and spatia...
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  • New massive dataset of bacterial proteins

    Scientists from Switzerland and the Netherlands have conducted a quantitative and qualitative analysis of the proteins that the bacterium Escherichia coli expresses in 22 different growth conditions. More than 2,300 proteins were identified, some at average levels of one copy per cell. The result...
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  • Humans carry more antibiotic-resistant bacteria than animals they work with

    Humans carry more antibiotic-resistant bacteria than animals they work with

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are a concern for the health and well-being of both humans and farm animals. One of the most common and costly diseases faced by the dairy industry is bovine mastitis, a potentially fatal bacterial inflammation of the mammary gland (IMI). Widespread use of antibiotic...
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  • Why do animals dig waterholes?

    Why do animals dig waterholes?

    Scientists from Berlin showed that animals in the Ruaha National Park in Tanzania, East Africa, already dig waterholes during dry seasons even if water is still available in the riverbed. When the river dries up and the water stops flowing, the water quality in the remaining pools deteriorates as...
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  • Success combating multi-resistant bacteria in stables

    Success combating multi-resistant bacteria in stables

    Multi-resistant bacteria represent a major problem not only in hospitals but also in animal husbandry. A study of the University Bonn describes how a farmer successfully eliminated these pathogens entirely from his pig stable. However, the radical hygiene measures taken in this case can only be a...
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  • Microbial companions of humans, animals are highly specialized

    Microbial companions of humans, animals are highly specialized

    It has long been known that almost all organisms have microbial companions. However, only about ten years ago did researchers find out that these bacterial communities are extremely rich in species. Humans and other mammals are often hosts to several thousand species, and even minute organisms li...
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  • Muzzle in on cattle classification

    Muzzle in on cattle classification

    Researchers are developing a biometric identification system for cattle that could reduce food fraud and allow ranchers to control their stock more efficiently. The system described in the International Journal of Image Mining uses the unique features of a prominent part of the animal to identify...
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